✎✎✎ Summary Of Corrie Ten Booms The Hiding Place

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Summary Of Corrie Ten Booms The Hiding Place



It would do them a world of good! She must deny that there were any Jews there. Christy If you survive the Holocaust, you can write whatever Personal Narrative: My Life In Houston want, in my opinion. The broken chair, the worn out clothes, the beat Summary Of Corrie Ten Booms The Hiding Place breaks, the annoying people in my life--why would I Summary Of Corrie Ten Booms The Hiding Place and thank God for them? Due to his previous connections to Summary Of Corrie Ten Booms The Hiding Place Jewish community, Willem is already sheltering some Dutch Jews. They put their lives on the line to help with Malcolm X Learning To Read Rhetorical Analysis very unpopular cause. I was definitely in awe of the unwavering and deeply held faith of ECS 306 Weekly Reflection inspiring Dutch Christian Summary Of Corrie Ten Booms The Hiding Place before, during and after WWII. A guard Summary Of Corrie Ten Booms The Hiding Place at her, swinging her thick leather crop while Summary Of Corrie Ten Booms The Hiding Place girl shrieked in pain and terror. Feb 21, Theme Of Scapegoat In Sula Jarmusch rated it it was amazing.

The Hiding Place by Corrie Ten Boom *Characters Analysis*

I've read The Hiding Place a few times before but not in recent years. With so many Christian friends on Goodreads, it is the book that I see most often on people's 'favourite' shelf. During this re-read I was reminded that it deserves to be there. Most of you will know the story; Corrie ten Boom and her sister Betsie are the unmarried daughters of Casper, a Christian watchmaker in Holland duri Most people have started with parties and fireworks. Most of you will know the story; Corrie ten Boom and her sister Betsie are the unmarried daughters of Casper, a Christian watchmaker in Holland during the early 's. They could be running a successful and profitable business but, as Christians, are prone to charity and acts of kindness leaving them comfortable but not well-off.

The scene is set by the author, Corrie, and a picture of a happy family life emerges. The everyday details and the author's humour are what make the book, indeed she is a marvellous story-teller and none of it is in any way monotonous. During the Nazi occupation in the late 's, the ten Boom family adapt their business to harbour Jewish refugees as they become involved in the underground movement of the period. Corrie, in particular, devotes her time and attention to caring for and helping these persecuted people and takes great risks in the process.

Eventually, their happy family life, which had gradually been eroded by events on the horizon, is shattered as the entire family are captured and led off to Germany. Corrie and her sister Betsie end up in Ravensbruck, a notorious concentration camp. Here, Corrie faces up to her spiritual weakness as her physical body suffers: Selfishness took on a life of its own Oh this was the great ply of Satan in that kingdom of his:To display such blatant evil that one could almost believe that one's own secret sins didn't matter I came to Paul's account of his thorn in the flesh Of course it was not my wholeness, but Christ's that made the difference.

The breakthrough comes when Corrie, following the example of her never wavering sister who even praises God for the fleas, realises that all is not in vain and life has a purpose again: But as the rest of the world grew stranger, one thing became increasingly clear. And that was the reason the two of us were here. Why others should suffer we were not shown. As for us, from morning until lights out, whenever we were not in ranks for roll call, our Bible was the center of an ever-widening circle of help and hope.

Like waifs clustered round a blazing fire, we gathered about it, holding out our hearts to it warmth and light. The blacker the night around us grew, the brighter and truer and more beautiful burned the word of God. Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him that loved us. What an incredible picture of true faith in the face of such hardness and suffering. Anyone going through trials will benefit from this book. Likewise those seeking to be content in all circumstances and to rejoice in the Lord always. The Hiding Place is clean: there is no swearing or blasphemy, there is no sexual content, there are some graphic scenes relating to the treatment of prisoners and the suffering in the concentration camp.

These are relayed factually without embellishment or sensationalism. An incredible testimony of a family completely sold out for God whatever the cost. View all 13 comments. Apr 17, Karen rated it it was amazing. By far one of the best and most inspirational books I've ever read. I've underlined so many parts of this book! I first read this with my first book club almost 10 years ago and read it back in October with my current book club -- still find it absolutely amazing and one I want to read and re-read. One of my favorite themes of the book is stated by the author on page "the experiences of our lives, when we let God use them, become the mysterious and perfect preparation for the work He will gi By far one of the best and most inspirational books I've ever read.

One of my favorite themes of the book is stated by the author on page "the experiences of our lives, when we let God use them, become the mysterious and perfect preparation for the work He will give us to do. Not that only good things will happen to us, but that all things will work for our good. Even when our Father takes us, not to "the windmill We can trust in Him that all things will work together for our good. Another favorite part is in the example of Betsie, the author's sister, who gives thanks in all circumstances, even for the fleas p. Several pages later, the author explains how even the fleas worked together for their good p.

Even when we may not always have the "whys", we can trust in Him that our experiences are for our good. I found it amazing when Nollie is asked by if Annaliese is a Jew and she responds, "yes. Nollie has perfect faith that no suffering will come to Annaliese because Nollie obeyed Him in being honest in all things. Miraculously and sure enough, Annaliese is set free.

As a mother, I have always wondered how the Jewish people hid their children crying babies etc. I found it poignant and sad when the author noted that "even the youngest had developed the uncanny silence of small hunted things" p. Above all, I love this book for its reminder to me of the eternal perspective. How true that He can give us His perspective when we feel trapped in the reality of filthy and cramped barracks, His way of seeing people who we cannot understand, His forgiveness for those who have hurt us, His love for those we think we cannot love, and His strength to replace our weaknesses.

Which leads me to a final favorite quote and life-lesson I've learned: "When He tells us to love our enemies [or any other thing He has asked us to do], He gives, along with the command the love itself" p. View 2 comments. The Hiding Place is a story about how the depths of faith and spirituality can get a person through even the darkest nightmare. Corrie ten Boom and her family led the Dutch Underground during the Nazi occupation of Holland, aiding and hiding Jewish people in a secret room in their home above their watchmaker shop. Their efforts eventually cost them their freedom and in some cases, their lives. Corrie and members of her family are arrested and sent to a concentration camp.

This is not exactly a n The Hiding Place is a story about how the depths of faith and spirituality can get a person through even the darkest nightmare. This is not exactly a new story; we have heard numerous inspirational stories of people who have suffered monstrosities beyond our imagination. They shared their love, their hidden Bible, and their love of God with all those who would listen. They looked at the smallest things as a gift. Upon meeting one of her former S. From my shoulder along my arm and through my hand, a current seemed to pass from me to him, while into my heart sprang a love for this stranger that almost overwhelmed me.

They did not personally take credit for any of their courage or capabilities. Whatever bravery or skill I had ever shown were gifts of God — sheer loans from Him of the talent needed to do a job. I do believe she had these gifts all along and should congratulate herself on having the knowledge and strength to use these gifts in such a powerful way. Her feelings that these gifts were later absent were possibly a result of a bit of natural fear and vulnerability due to all she endured, not because something was given and then taken away from her.

Despite the fact that I found this memoir informative and the ten Booms admirable, there was a bit something lacking in the storytelling. It fell a bit flat for me and was maybe due to the span of time between when these events occurred and when this story was written. It perhaps lacked a bit of the urgency and poignancy I have come to expect. On the other hand, it still remains a very interesting book.

I gave this 3. View all 9 comments. Dec 30, Noel rated it it was ok Shelves: non-fiction , wwii , received-through-paperbackswap , memoir. Two stars. That's the best I can do on a book that came highly recommended and that I read with relish as I had just been to Amsterdam and surrounding areas, visited the Museum of the Resistance and the old Jewish Synagogue referred to in the book.

So why two stars? I just didn't believe a lot of what I read. Here's what I do believe. I think Corrie, her sister Betsy, her father and other family members were courageous, passionate, religious, pro-active and bold. They did what many in Holland di Two stars. They did what many in Holland did, but what many chose not to do. They put their lives on the line to help with a very unpopular cause. They risked their necks to hide jews, feed them, comfort them and resist the authority of their German invaders.

In that I find them commendable. The father figure was an admirable man, a man of principle who lived truly an exemplary life and imparted his teachings to not only his family, but all who surrounded him. A man of peace, but of strong determination. A man of immensely strong faith which he passed along to his children. So far, so good. So what's my squabble? The book was written a full 25 years after the facts, and I think it shows. Corrie was in her late 70's when the book was written, and it was written by two people who weren't there.

The narrative at times becomes too convenient, too sugar coated. There were no fights amongst the throngs of people living in the beje. I think the old saying that "time heals everything" clearly applies to this book, as it seems to be a bit whitewashed in the veil of faith in Jesus to solve all, in prayers that constantly come through and in the miracle of the never ending vitamins. I most certainly think we all believe in God when in the trenches, but I don't believe in the Santa Claus God who gave to Corrie, but perhaps withheld from others who were praying just as hard. It came across as preachy and childish all these years later. So many people were hurt, humiliated, beaten, and brutally murdered -- and I am sure just about each and every one of them prayed to their Jesus as well.

To end on a positive note -- the faith that this family had, the true faith in doing the right thing -- is admirable; when Corrie wrote "released" in her jail cell to signify the death of blank , she showed a deep and profound faith in that death is not the end, only a fresh start in a better place. Her fortitude and strength were truly remarkable. View all 16 comments. Dec 05, Leila rated it it was amazing Shelves: autobiographies , my-wow-books , classics , my-challenge-books , non-fiction , war , biblical.

I have read this book before many years ago. Although Corrie is a deeply commited Christian you don't have be of any particular religion to read and appreciate this book. She and her I have read this book before many years ago. She and her older sister Betsie lived through terrifying times to achieve this and endured starvation, torture and humiliation when captured by the Gestapo. The first half of the book is more about her daily life as the daughter of a man widely acclaimed as a watch and clock maker and repairer and a member of a loving family. The second part is all about how they devote their lives to the rescue of Jews from the enemy.

Corrie and her sister have a powerful faith in God and the story is inspiring but heartrending. This book is for me a classic and supremely special whatever your beliefs might be or not be. View all 6 comments. The book begins with the ten Boom family celebrating the th anniversary of the family business; they sell and repair watches under the family's elderly father, Casper ten Boom. Casper lives with his unmarried daughters, Corrie, the narrator and a watchmaker herself, and Betsie, who takes care of the house. It seems as if everyone in the Dutch town of Haarlem has shown up to the party, including Corrie's sister Nollie, her brother Willem, and her nephews Peter and Kik.

Willem, a minister in the Dutch Reformed Church, brings a Jewish man, who has just escaped from Germany. The man's beard has been burned off by some thugs, a grim reminder of what was happening just to the east of the Netherlands. She talks about the only man she ever loved, a young man named Karel, who ultimately marries a woman from a rich family. Eventually, both Nollie and Willem marry. After the deaths of Corrie's mother and aunts, Corrie, Betsie and their father settle down into a pleasant domestic life. Then, in , the Nazis invaded the Netherlands. The family has strong morals based on Christian beliefs and feel obligated to help them Jewish in every way possible.

Corrie, who has grown to think of herself as a middle-aged spinster, finds herself involved in black market operations, using stolen ration cards, and eventually hiding Jews in her own home. Oct 03, Diane rated it really liked it Shelves: audiobooks , religion , war. I read this book in honor of my mother. Corrie worked in her father's watchmaking shop and used the store as a front to help with underground activities. A secret room was built in the family's home that allowed Jews to hide when German agents visited the house. Eventually, Corrie and her family were arrested and sent to prison, and later to a concentration camp. Throughout the ordeal, Corrie relied on her Christian beliefs to give her hope and strength. After finishing the book, I can understand why my mother was so captivated by Corrie's story.

My mom was also strong in her Christian faith, and she had a longtime fascination with World War II, always trying to understand how such a tragedy could have happened. I am not a true believer, but I can appreciate why "The Hiding Place" was so meaningful to my mother. It is a powerful story of love and family and faith, and reading about Good triumphing over Evil should be comforting. However, reading this book in was quite disturbing, especially with reports of immigrant children being arrested and held in cages, and the continuing problems of racism, white nationalism, violence and war. Perhaps if I had read this book before Trump took office I wouldn't have been so upset by it.

But that's the slyness about books — they'll surprise you, catch you at odd moments and show you connections you didn't expect. I wish my mother was still here so we could discuss this book. We could talk about the news, and try to understand why such tragedies are happening again. Okay, so the many five stars all around on this here book page were warranted.

The narrator is terrific and emotive and has the ability to draw you into the time and place instead of taking you out of it! Corrie ten Boom is a 40 something spinster at peace with her quiet life. As conditions become increasingly worse for the unfortunate people in her beloved town, she decides to put her life in danger in order to save those of others. Her family has a hidden room built and they take in the desperate.

Eventually she is imprisoned, along with most of her family. She recounts the long, grueling days of hellish conditions in prison and in concentration camps. The sickness, the starvation and the everyday cruelties inflicted. Their faith makes up a big part of who they were and how they managed to make it through the inhumane conditions. If you read this account, it will leave a mark on you for certain. This is a profound book, and one that will not leave you unmoved. I was even inspired to write a poem before I finished reading it it does contain a few spoilers for those who don't know Corrie's story : Victory Song by Melissa M.

May 16, Golden glimpses of the sun, Bits of clouds between the bars. Coughing blood, matted hair, Questions, memories, leaving scars. Making friends with tiny ants, Spilling crumbs to bring them out. Crossing days off on the wall, Wondering what this is all about. Planned by This is a profound book, and one that will not leave you unmoved. Planned by God, even this? Yes, and rejoicing still, Corrie ten Boom lying there, Knowing that this is God's will. Father died--no, was released To Canaan's fairer land above.

Jews in hiding did escape, This the outcome of God's love. Will we sing in trials now, Fight the sin and lonely days? Will we bravely others reach, And remember God's holy ways? Lord, we ask for strength and grace, Love for others true and strong, Love for You above all else, And to sing Your victory song! View all 5 comments. Shelves: biography , spirituality , religion , history , memoir , non-fiction , ultimate-reading-list. This is the story of Corrie ten Boom, a self-described "spinster" watchmaker who lived with her father and sister and was pushing fifty when she became part of the Dutch Resistance helping to hide Jews from the Nazis. Eventually betrayed, she wound up in a Gestapo prison for a few months, then doing forced labor in the Vught Concentration Camp, which harsh as it was, was paradisaical compared to where she next wound up until released, the notorious Ravensbruck Concentration Camp.

This is her fir This is the story of Corrie ten Boom, a self-described "spinster" watchmaker who lived with her father and sister and was pushing fifty when she became part of the Dutch Resistance helping to hide Jews from the Nazis. This is her first person account, written decades after the fact with the help of John and Elizabeth Sherrill. It got off to what I found a slow start in the first four chapters which tells of the life of her and her family before World War II.

I thought it picked up in pace a great deal in the later chapters once it began to tell of her involvement aiding Jews in the Underground, and from that moment I was completely engrossed--and indeed the story, particularly before they were betrayed to the Nazis, sometimes surprised me with its warmth and humor. Her father, for instance, never really understood why all the Resistance people were calling themselves "Smit" and kept asking whether they were related to this or that Smit family he knew. I picked up the book because it was recommended on the Ultimate Reading List in the "Inspirational Non-fiction" section.

For "inspirational" read "religious" and almost always "Christian" and I indeed found it in the "Christian Inspiration" section. Some reviews complained about the religiosity, but it really didn't bother me--and I'm an atheist with little patience when I feel I'm being preached at. Perhaps it's just that I took this in stride as part and parcel of Miss Ten Boom. That faith was just as much as the foundation of her thinking and deeds as Hinduism was for Ghandi or Buddhism for the Dalai Llama. There's nothing smug or self-righteous in her tone. Nor did she come across as "goodie two shoes" to me--she sometimes understandably struggled with anger and fear.

She's human--although in my book still a hero. I even saw one review that called her a "bigot. The Ten Booms saved many Jews, hiding them in their own home at great risk to themselves, tried to serve them kosher food when they could, celebrated the Sabbath with them and Jewish holidays. I saw no sign of bigotry towards those of other beliefs. Having a strong faith that a person takes seriously in deciding how to act does not make one a bigot. Anyone who mistakes that for bigotry has their own issues with anti-Christian bigotry in my opinion. On the other hand, I do agree with one reviewer that I suspect that her Christian faith did "sugar coat" things more than a little and probably colored her recollection. I don't think Ten Boom ever consciously shaded the truth, but especially given this was recounted almost thirty years later when Ten Boom was in her seventies, I do wonder if time put a gloss on memories such as the vitamin drop "miracle.

Viktor E. Frankl's story of his experiences in four Concentration Camps including Auschwitz, Man's Search for Meaning , was written by him in nine days within months of his liberation. Elie Wiesel's story of his time in Auschwitz, Night was written in his twenties within a decade after his experiences there. The Hiding Place doesn't have the freshness and intensity of those accounts.

Also, though it tells an extraordinary story, it's not always extraordinarily well-written when I compare it to the other books mentioned above. I read Frankl's account just before this book, and read Wiesel's book for the second time less than two months ago. Those are powerful accounts that deserve the name literature. This doesn't, which is why I haven't rated it nearly as highly as those other two books. But it's still a often gripping, at times moving book. View all 8 comments. Sep 09, L rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: anyone over age I qualified the recommendation based on age because there are some difficult situations I think, for younger people.

I have read many, many holocaust books, and this is by far my favorite. I wept and wept, not just for the suffering she endured, but mostly for the way in which she and her sister Betsie faced their suffering with such faith. For how they looked for opportunities to be selfless in a concentration camp, and how the women there were changed just by their example. I wept at my utter I qualified the recommendation based on age because there are some difficult situations I think, for younger people. I wept at my utter failure in faith. It made me reexamine everything I take for granted daily, and to thank God even for the fleas! Feb 19, Elizabeth Dragina rated it it was amazing. This book though. Feb 21, Olivia Jarmusch rated it it was amazing.

This book had such an impact on me. How would I respond if I was faced with such intense trials and persecution? Every Christian should read this book, so powerful and encouraging! Nov 17, Addy S. She endured so much, including the loss of her father and sister while imprisoned in a concentration camp. Yet, through it all, she held on to the only sure foundation she had left: Jesus Christ. Betsie, her sister, loved everyone: including the people who would whip her. She bore no hatred for anyone. What a wonderful person! I also bear a great admiration for their father, who wa "There's more work to be done I also bear a great admiration for their father, who was faithful until the end.

A great man indeed. Though Corrie struggled to trust and hope, she did not struggle in vain. Her story still lives on today, in the hearts of her readers, who were impacted by her story. Betsie's dying words, "But there's still more work to be done.. There IS more work to be done - the spreading of the gospel and the love of Christ. Even in her death, her words live on. View 1 comment. Apr 09, Kelly H. Maybedog rated it really liked it Shelves: what-bio-or-memoir , what-nonfiction.

What makes this particular book different from other better stories about the Holocaust is that it's from the perspective of a Christian woman who was interned. While it's extremely important for us not to forget that one group of people was specifically targeted Jews it's also important for us to realize that this horrible thing went beyond that.

But What makes this particular book different from other better stories about the Holocaust is that it's from the perspective of a Christian woman who was interned. But non-Jews sometimes need more than an abstract reminder of how the Holocaust affected us all. Perhaps this first person narrative might bring it home. It's not that well written but it's interesting and informative and I enjoyed it. Mar 07, Loretta rated it really liked it Shelves: myreading-challenge , biographies , auto-biographies , history. Slow in spots but overall, a good, sad book. Mar 13, LemonLinda rated it it was amazing. This book touched me in a way that few books do. It made me want to work to become a better person.

I was definitely in awe of the unwavering and deeply held faith of this inspiring Dutch Christian family before, during and after WWII. They assisted in the Dutch underground movement helping several hundred Jews and others in peril to escape imminent arrest, persecution and execution that would have inevitably come to those they were helping all the while realizing that these activities were like This book touched me in a way that few books do.

They assisted in the Dutch underground movement helping several hundred Jews and others in peril to escape imminent arrest, persecution and execution that would have inevitably come to those they were helping all the while realizing that these activities were likely to be reported to the authorities. But even more so, I was struck by the forgiving natuure within this family even for their persecutors. It is easy to pray for the sick, the needy, the downtrodden. But to pray for those who were behind the terrors and daily tortures of their incarceration - the kinds of torture often found during times of war - takes faith in God to a level above that of even the most devout Christians. But that is the kind of faith found in this family.

They even found a reason to be thankful for the fleas infesting their prison halls. And their faith in God brought about daily miracles in spite of the most horrific circumstances. Truly an inspiring read! Apr 11, Kellyn Roth rated it it was amazing Shelves: adventurous-books , classical-reads , nonfiction-books , books-for-adults , books-for-teens , christian-fiction , read-for-school.

The Hiding Place by Corrie ten Boom was actually a very good book, much to my surprise. I expected it to be very boring, very depressing, and very preachy. At times it did drag a little - especially at the beginning - and it was sad, but it could be called preachy, and the hope won out in the end. It won out through much of the book, actually; I never felt truly depressed. I just knew God was there. Corrie and Betsie both showed their belief in this truth in the way they dealt with difficult sit The Hiding Place by Corrie ten Boom was actually a very good book, much to my surprise. Corrie and Betsie both showed their belief in this truth in the way they dealt with difficult situations. At last the book arrives at the Nazi occupation of Holland.

This is when the story really starts to pick up. In their own quiet way, the ten Booms stand up to the Nazis - first by keeping their radio from being confiscated … and slowly through becoming involved in the Resistance and saving people. They become deeply involved in the Resistance. The book gives us many examples of them risking their lives to save a few people. Over many months in prison and in concentration camps, Betsie and Corrie both minister to others. They are a support and guide to the women there - hosting a Bible study and prayer meeting of sorts, encouraging and lifting up others whenever they can. But she was definitely very noble - if a little too optimistic for her own good, methinks.

Corrie was the narrator and the main character, of course, and I found myself liking her more than other characters. She had a lot of common sense and gumption. Later I found out that she was just released because of an error and the rest of the women in her group were killed shortly afterwards. It was God! The point of this book is, of course, that God is there even when things are dark - even when it seems like there is no life, there is no hope. He is our hiding place in time of trouble. This book can teach you so much … about history, about people, and most of all, about God. The author was very honest about the tough things she went through and the things she saw others go through. And yes, it was horrific … but the message of seeing God in it all was incredible!

I wish everyone who had to go through anything traumatic or horrific could read this book. It would do them a world of good! The writing style was excellent - it was plain and truthful while getting the point across without preaching. My mom got emotional about this book. I did not. Not much upsets me. But it was very emotional what with everything they had to go through and then how it all wrapped up. I can see how some people might cry when they read it. In the course of the hour-long interrogation, it became clear to Corrie that the Gestapo had been mistaken about the true nature of the workings at the Beje.

Corrie genuinely had little knowledge of this, and she had little information to share with Rahms. When he asked Corrie about the good works she did in accordance with her faith, she talked about her work with mentally handicapped children. The interrogation resumed the next day. This time, Rahms attempted to appeal to Corrie by asking her about her family and her faith. Rahms spoke about his distaste for the grim work he was engaged in at Scheveningen and his fears for what might happen to his family at home in Germany. Corrie told him that Jesus Christ could be his light and salvation, even in a dark and cruel world. Rahms struggled to understand why a supposedly loving and benevolent God put a devout Christian like Corrie in a filthy solitary confinement cell.

Or why He would allow such a good and pious man like Casper ten Boom to die alone in prison, separated from his family and everyone he knew. Corrie, of course, knew that these were the workings of God, not for humans to question or try to understand. Here's what you'll find in our full The Hiding Place summary :. Her penchant for always having a book nearby has never faded, though her reading tastes have since evolved.

Rina reads around books every year, with a fairly even split between fiction and non-fiction. Her favorite genres are memoirs, public health, and locked room mysteries. Your email address will not be published. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Skip to content. Posted by Rina Shah Sep 1, Here's what you'll find in our full The Hiding Place summary : Why devout Christian Corrie ten Boom decided to stand up to the Nazi occupation How ten Boom and the Jewish neighbors she was hiding were caught How ten Boom survived the concentration camp and left with even stronger faith Get the world's best book summaries now.

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